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Cake Cake Cake Pops

Cake Cake Cake Pops

I’ll start out by being completely honest. I would probably never bake a cake with the intention of making cake pops. Cake is for eating cake. Leftover cake is for making cake pops. With that being said, my recipe calls for exactly that—leftover cake. I suppose you could bake a birthday cake and follow the recipe from there. But let’s be clear . . .

I endorse eating WHOLE slices of cake.

First things first—I didn’t use any special cake pop molds or anything fancy. I rolled them by hand the old-fashioned way, and I learned these tips through trial-and-error. You want to start with cold cake, candy dips, and of course some lollipop sticks and sprinkles and décor of your choice.

 

Make the Cake Mixture [And It’s Not Even My Birthday]

You can do this two ways—by separating the frosting from the cake or by mashing the cake with its frosting all at once. Guess which one I chose. If you’re confident that you can get the perfect cake-frosting ratio (or just a risk-taker like me), just throw the cake in the bowl and mix–adding more cake or frosting to the mixture as needed.

 

Otherwise, scrape the frosting of the cake and set aside. Crumble up the frosting-less cake in a large bowl. Then, add about ¼ cup of frosting at a time, until the mixture turns into “mushy-cake.”

 

Don’t use too much frosting! This will cause your cake pops to be too soft and gooey on the inside (which still sounds delicious and isn’t the worst thing in the world if you ask me). If you think you added too much, no worries—just toss in some more cake.

 

Taste a spoonful—the mixture should still have the consistency of cake and taste like “mushy–cake,” as opposed to cake-flavored frosting.

 

To firm up the cake mixture before forming the cake balls, refrigerate the cake mixture. You can refrigerate the mixture for at least an hour, or overnight.

 

This is TOO much frosting :

But these are just about right :

Form the Cake Pops [Now Let’s Get in Formation]

Melt a small amount of chocolate (candy dips) in a bowl.

 

Roll the cold cake mixture into quarter-sized rounds and place on a baking sheet lined with wax or parchment paper. If the cake balls are too large, they’ll be prone to falling off the stick (whoops!)

 

To make each pop, dip the tip of a lollipop stick into the melted chocolate and immediately insert it into the cake ball about halfway through. Return to baking sheet.

 

Cover the baking sheet and place in the freezer for at least an hour, or overnight.

A few of my mess ups :

Frost & Decorate

Melt candy melts in a deep glass or coffee cup. I prefer candy melts or melted chocolate, as the melts create more of a “shell” that is not as quick to melt.

 

The coating will dry and harden pretty quickly, so you may have to re-melt the candy coating in the cup throughout the decorating process.

 

Once the cake pops are frozen firm, carefully dip one cake pop at a time into the candy melt coating. To remove excess, lightly tap and rotate the cake pop allowing any extra candy coating to drip off. (Avoid heavily tapping the cake pop, or else the pop will fall off the stick . . . which isn’t as pretty, but it’s still delicious). Use a spoon to get the chocolate evenly around the cake pop.

 

Sans sprinkles and extra decoration—return the coated cake pop to the baking sheet. I don’t worry about standing them up yet. Place the cake pop “pop down, stick up” and allow to dry.

 

If opting for sprinkles and such, twirl the cake pop in sprinkles immediately after coating the cake pop before it begins to dry and harden. Unless you’re an expert, I always recommend sprinkles or some form of decoration, as it helps conceal an imperfect coating job.

Serving Up the Cake Pops

You can place the cake pops through a piece Styrofoam, or in a mason jar. Treat bags over each cake pop, tied with some kitchen strong or a ribbon make for a cute party treat or gift. If you’re not serving right away, you can freeze them and eat them later.

 

“A Party Without Cake is Just a Meeting.” — Julia Child

 

Cake Cake Cake Pops

December 13, 2017

By:

Ingredients
  • Leftover cake with frosting (i.e., birthday cake, chocolate, red velvet work—take your pick!)
  • Candy Dips (I used Wilton Candy Dips which can be found at the grocery store or a craft/party store)
  • Lollipop sticks
  • Sprinkles (optional)
  • Treat Bags (optional)
Directions
  • Step 1 In a large bowl, mix the cake with it’s frosting until the mixture turns into “mushy-cake.” Refrigerate the cake mixture for at least an hour, or overnight.
  • Step 2 Melt a small amount of the Candy Dips chocolate in a bowl. Roll the cold cake mixture into quarter-sized rounds and place on a baking sheet lined with wax or parchment paper.
  • Step 3 To make each pop, dip the tip of a lollipop stick into the melted chocolate and immediately insert it into the cake ball about halfway through. Return to baking sheet, cover and place in the freezer for at least an hour.
  • Step 4 Melt chocolate in a narrow glass or coffee cup. Once the cake pops are frozen firm, carefully dip one cake pop at a time into the chocolate coating. To remove excess, lightly tap and rotate the cake pop allowing any extra melted chocolate to drip off.
  • Step 5 If using sprinkles, decorate immediately and return the coated cake pop to the baking sheet to dry.

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